Map of power plant in U.S.A- Zalak Patel

This insanely detailed map shows every power plant in the United States in march 2015. Covering electricity generation from January to May, 2015, the map brings to light some interesting details; such as noting that the 34 percent of the nation’s power produced by coal comes from just 511 plants, in contrast with the 1,740 natural gas-powered electric plants that have produced 30 percent of power. As we know, renewable have a long way to go, but the breakdown of solar, wind and hydro projects make clear which direction individual states need to move in.

There are multiple numbers of circles in different sizes with various colors. The size of the circle shows megawatts produced and color shows which kind of energy power plant it is.

We can see the eastern and southern city of U.S.A have more power energy plants compare to northern and western city of U.S.A by using colors. Energy plants are much balanced in all over U.S.A compare to production.

We can see the orange color more than other colors. It shows that there are more natural gas pants, and then in order to colors, like blue color shows the hydro plants, pink color shows the nuclear plants, green color shows the wind plants, red color shows the oil plants, yellow color shows the solar plants and others.

 

                                       Plant capacity by power source in megawatts

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Electricity generation by power source, January to May 2015
Local electric utilities take advantage of the power sources most accessible to them: coal mines, dammed rivers, new supplies of natural gas or nuclear plants to generate the bulk of the nation’s electricity. This shows the source of electricity generation in each state in 2015.

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There are 511 coal-powered electric plants in the U.S. They have generated 34 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. The leading fuel for electricity generation in the country, coal is most popular in the Midwest, Appalachia and the East Coast, but is also the primary source in Wyoming, Utah, Montana and Arizona. It generated the vast majority of the nation’s electricity in the late 1980s but now creates one-third with natural gas gaining steadily. Coal is the chief source of electricity in 22 states and creates a majority of the electrical power in 14 states.

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There are 1,740 natural gas-powered electric plants in the U.S. They have generated 30 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. Advances and expansion of fracking in the past decade have unlocked vast supplies of natural gas from shale deposits all over the country. Natural gas is the predominant source of power in 15 states including all of the Gulf of Mexico states, Virginia, Georgia, New York, Massachusetts, Nevada and California.

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There are 99 reactors at 63 nuclear electric plants in the U.S. They have generated 20 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. Five new nuclear plants are under construction following decades of pause after the initial push in the 1970s and 1980s driven by the first oil shock. Only South Carolina, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New Hampshire get a plurality of their power from nuclear. Twenty states have no nuclear electricity generation at all.

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There are 1,436 hydroelectric plants in the U.S. They have generated 7 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. Washington, Oregon and Idaho lead the nation in power from hydroelectric plants. It’s a feast-or-famine source, providing 48 percent or more of the power in five states, but less than 10 percent of the electricity in 40 states. Government-run plants generate most of the power.

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There are 843 wind-powered electric plants in the U.S. They have generated 5 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. Wind is the fastest growing source, finding a home in the Great Plains where wind blows reliably across wide open spaces. Iowa and South Dakota get one third of their power from wind, followed by Kansas, Vermont and North Dakota.

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There are 772 solar-powered electric plants in the U.S. They have generated 1 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. Sun power is predominantly in the Southwest where the sun shines the most. Thirty-nine states have no solar generating plants. California gets 8 percent of its electricity from solar and Nevada gets 5 percent, followed by Vermont and Arizona with 4 percent each.

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There are 1,098 oil-powered electric plants in the U.S. They have generated 1 percent of the nation’s electricity this year. Petroleum is no longer a popular source for electricity generation. After the rise of OPEC and the oil shocks and price increases of the 1970s, utilities switched to other fuels, mostly coal. Hawaii is the only state that gets a plurality of its electricity from oil.

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/national/power-plants/


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ideabatch2

This website is a compilation of work done by students of INDUS University, Ahmedabad. The course was a two week long module where they engaged with mapping and unfloding the many layers of small public spaces in Ahmedabad city. This course was taught by Mansi Shah

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